Viper 5901 Full Feature Car Alarm With Remote Start And 2-Way Pager

Viper 5901 Full Feature Car Alarm With Remote Start And 2-Way Pager


Viper 5901 Full Feature Car Alarm With Remote Start And 2-Way Pager


Saturday, April 7, 2012

A chronicle of the Most popular stable Door Openers

A chronicle of the Most popular stable Door Openers


Genie, Chamberlain, Sears, Wayne-Dalton, Linear, and Universal (SkyLink) make some of the best garage door openers on the market. The following stock reviews should be useful for those in the market for a garage door opener.

A chronicle of the Most popular stable Door Openers

A chronicle of the Most popular stable Door Openers

A chronicle of the Most popular stable Door Openers


A chronicle of the Most popular stable Door Openers



A chronicle of the Most popular stable Door Openers

The Genie® enterprise is one of the most familiar and trusted clubs in the Us. Founded in 1923 under the name of the Alliance Manufacturing company, Genie commerce consumer, commercial as well as troops products. The Genie® brand of garage door openers are very beloved for their high power remote-controlled garage door opening systems.

Genie produces a wide range of garage door openers and the most beloved brands from Genie are: the Excelerator, the Screw Drive and the Chain Glide. Other brands include the Alliance, the Blue Max, the Crusader, Python, Pro-Max, Lift-a-door, OverHead Door, Norelco, Code-Dodger and Intellicode.

Genie uses state-of-the-art technology in its garage door openers. The Intellicode® remote access protection principles changes the protection code to one of billions of combinations each time the transmitter is used, thus making it one of the safest systems in the world. Its Sate-T-Beam(Tm) infrared beam principles can sense the nearnessy of objects in the door's path and can thus forestall damage to equipment. Genie garage door openers can be installed on both singular as well as double doors. They use ½ horsepower and can work on doors that are up to 8 feet high. Genie garage door openers open twice as fast as other garage door openers but close at normal speeds. They are very quiet, have a bright, wide-angle lighting and superior motor build and can work in any weather conditions. Such industrialized technologies make the Genie brand of garage door openers most beloved in the world.

Chamberlain GmbH based in Saarwellingen, Germany is a needful victualer of residential garage door openers, commercial and residential gate operators, and remote controls in the world. The enterprise has offices in France, England, the Netherlands, Poland, Slovak Republic and Singapore. Chamberlain products are ready approximately over the whole world.

Chamberlain offers garage door openers in commercial as well as residential varieties. Chamberlain®, Whisper Drive® and Power Drive® garage Door Openers are the most beloved brands from Chamberlain.

LiftMaster® is the most beloved brand from Chamberlain. This range also includes the Liftmaster garage door opener remotes, transfer parts, mini transmitters, keychain remotes and other accessories. LiftMaster garage door openers are ready in different drive and horsepower modes and are combined with a wide range of accessories and options. The LiftMaster range contains: the Estate Series, the superior series and the undertaker of a package deal series. These are ready in the belt drive; screw drive as well as in chain drive models.

Chamberlain's Power Drive® and Whisper Drive® belong to the residential garage door opener kind in the do-it-yourself range. The Elite(Tm) range contains premier residential and commercial gate operators and access operate systems. The Sentex® range is for obtain residential and commercial garages.

Sears Holdings Corporation, parent of Kmart and Sears, Roebuck and Co., is the third largest broad line retailer in the Us. Sears Holdings is a prominent victualer of tools, lawn and garden, home electronics, and automotive repAir and maintenance. It Supplies the Craftsman range of garage door openers.

Craftsman Supplies power tools, storage chests and cabinets, bench power tools, mechanics tools, power tool accessories, normal hand tools, Compressor tools, carpentry tools and home protection and garage door openers and accessories. The Craftsman range of garage door openers consist of straightforward ½ hp garage door opener, ¾ hp garage door opener in chain drive models. Other products include the universal remote operate conversion kit with 1 remote, the 10ft chain drive prolongation kit, the 10ft prolongation kit for garage door opener, the 8ft prolongation kit for garage door opener, the 8ft rail prolongation kit, the Remote control, 3-function security, keyless entry pad, Plug-in light operate for garage door opener, the wireless garage door monitor and the prolongation kit (screw drive).

Wayne Dalton, established in 1954, is the producer and victualer of the safest residential and commercial garage doors and garage door openers in the Us. Wayne Dalton Supplies two kinds of garage door openers: wall mount and ceiling mount. The wall mount openers, an exclusive stock from Wayne Dalton, can be mounted on the wall beside the door. This helps to eliminate the chains, belts, screw drive and tract that ordinarily clutter the garage ceiling. This model also helps to eliminate noise and vibration to a large extent.

The Linear Corporate is a major producer of protection systems like garage door and garage door openers. Linear produces garage door openers accessories like the Linear Act 21 key chain transmitter, Linear Dr3A Linear Moore-O-Matic gate or garage opener receiver, Linear Dt2A gate or garage door opener transfer transmitter, Linear Dtc Moore-O-Matic Delta 3 Remote (same as Dtd or Dt) gate or garage door opener transfer transmitter, Linear Dtkp wireless keypad, Linear Mdr Megacode principles singular channel receiver, Linear Mdt-1 and Mdt-2 Megacode gate or garage door openers, Linear Mdtk wireless keypad model, Linear Mt-1B channel visor block coded transmitter, Linear Mt-2B channel visor block coded transmitter etc.

Linear also makes the Stanley range of garage door opener parts and accessories like Vemco, Quiet Glide, LightMaker, Home Innovative, Whistler, beloved Mechanics, SecureCode.

A chronicle of the Most popular stable Door Openers

VIN Number Decoding For Classic Muscle Cars

VIN Number Decoding For Classic Muscle Cars


One of the best pieces of advice I was ever given in regards to buying a classic muscle car was to invest in high quality resource materials so I could crack the code on Vehicle Identification Numbers (VIN) to make sure that I was not getting scammed.

VIN Number Decoding For Classic Muscle Cars

VIN Number Decoding For Classic Muscle Cars

VIN Number Decoding For Classic Muscle Cars


VIN Number Decoding For Classic Muscle Cars



VIN Number Decoding For Classic Muscle Cars

The best way to find a high quality book is to find what the experts are using. With the internet, you can type a subject like Camaro restoration book into the Amazon search box. You can also Google it and follow the links, which will take you to various forums and websites. Chevrolet by the Numbers, by Alvin Colvin, is the best book I have ever found for Chevrolet part numbers, Vehicle Identification Numbers (VIN), trim TAGs, and model ID. The book is an easy read, with chapters designated to the differentcomponents. Again, I used this process in my quest to purchase a rare Camaro. Just Google the car you are looking for and follow the links. The best resources will be obvious.

Here is a list of objects you will need when decoding your car.

Small flashlight, notebook, resource or reference book, mechanics mirror, pen or pencil, cordless or corded droplight, floor jack and jack-stands, coveralls, rags, brass wire brush, brake cleaner, yellow or white colored grease pencil, digital camera or Camcorder.

If you are continuing to read this information, I can only surmise that buying a classic muscle car with the proper numbers and matching parts is important to you! Good! It should be! If this is true, I will walk you through an example ofdecoding a car. This will give you an idea of what it takes to properly decode a car.

Be prepared to take your time. I also discovered a sure fire way to determine who your true friends are. Ask them to go along to help you decode a car! Having an extra body can sometimes cut your time in half. I also recomMend finding an expert or consultant on your car, and buying a couple of hours their time, especially if you are looking to purchase a special classic carmodel. It's been my experience that an extra set of eyes can only help the cause. I found an expert through one of my reference books. Prior to me going to look at my current car, I spent about an hour talking with him, and making a list of things I should be looking for. (Ofcourse, if you want someone to handle the process from A to Z, services are available. This is a great option if you are buying the car from remote.)

The Process

Before I arrived, the owner told me the car was basically a roller project, meaning the engine and transmission were removed from the car. The engine, transmission and other components were placed in a pile where it would be easy to look at the numbers. The owner also claimed it was a limited edition Camaro, yet he didn't have any paperwork like an original order invoice, or to protect or plate (a special metal plate shaped like a credit card that is used for warranty and repAir services). This type of paperwork trail eliminates the need for further docuMentation. If you do not havethis type of paperwork, then follow along. When I arrived at the location where the car was stored, the first thing I did was to check the VIN number. The VIN number is probably the most important number on a car. If you do not know how to decode a VIN on a particular Chevrolet, you will be unable to verify other components or numbers. What is nice about the book is it actually walks you through the whole decoding process, including providing the specific numbers. As a sidebar, any good resource book on your particular make and model car will outline the way to decode your car, including number locations and decoding info. On 1968 and 1969 Camaros, the VIN number is located on the top of the dash board on the drivers side. The number is visiblethrough the windshield. I wiped the dirt and dust off of the VIN TAGs, and copied the numbers into my notebook.

VIN number

I was able to determine that my car was originally a V8, it was a 2 door sports coupe, made in 1969, assembled in Norwood, Ohio, and it was the 662, 8XXrd car built at that plant in that year.

Trim tags.

In 1969, Camaro trim tags were located in the engine compartMent, riveted on the upper left hand corner of the firewall. I took my rag and cleaned all of the dust and gunk off of the trim tag. Since the numbers were not that clear, I recleaned the trim tag, and removed the rest of the gunk. I used my flashlight to illuminate the numbers, and then copied the numbers into my notebook. Some of the trim tag numbersmatched up with the VIN tag numbers, which was a good sign. The remaining numbers indicated that my body was car number 353, XXX to come down this plant's assembly line. The interior was originally a standard black interior, and the car was built in the first week of June, 1969. The car was originally painted blue dusk and it was equipped with a spoiler package and a chrome trim package. So far everything was lining up. The reason for all of this detail is to illustrate how you can confirm that what you think you are buying is exactly what you are getting.

Before I move on, I want to share how this is relevant. A husband and wife from my car club went to look at a Chevelle. The car was advertised as a Super Sport. During the inspectionprocess, and referencing the above book, they uncovered a number of inconsistencies. According to the numbers, the car had originally started out as a plain Jane 6 cylinder car. The car was now painted a different color, had a different color interior and a different engine. You get the picture. Over the years, one (or more) of the previous owners modified the car and tried to make it into a Super Sport. The point is it may have not been done maliciously, but the car still did not start out as a true Super Sport. And having the Super Sport option obviously raises the value of the car.

Engine code identification.

The engine is stamped in (2) places on a 69 Camaro. One is on the right front engine pad. The other location ison the rough casting portion on the rear of the engine, just above the oil Filter. Again I wiped off the areas I just described with brake cleaner on a rag classic lesbian. You need to have a clean surface, and normally brake cleaner will do the trick. The front engine pad numbers appeared to have been restamped at one time, maybe after the engine block was decked (Decking in a machine process to check the flatness of the block deck for irregularities that cause compression and water leaks.) The tricky part is reading the numbers on the area above the oil Filter. I recommend a really bright light and a magnifying glass. If that doesn't do it, then I suggest taking a little muriatic acid an applying it to the numbers. This should make the numbers readable. The reason this number is sometimes hardto decipher is because these engines were hand stamped and punched onto a rough surface. According to the numbers, I determined the engine was a high performance engine 425 horsepower, with a 4 speed manual transmission. The last numbers also corresponded with the last numbers in my VIN, which meant this was the original engine to this car. The numbers told me the engine was assembled June 14, which fell in line with the build date. The engine block part number that is cast into the rear of the block was cleaned with a rag and brake cleaner as well. The block part number indicated ahigh performance block used for Camaros. Another piece of the puzzle confirmed.

Rear axle identification.

The numbers on a Camaro rear axle are stamped on the top of the right axletube. My experience has been that this area is normally pretty crusty and rusty. Rear axle And this was no exception. After considerable wire brushing, I wiped the area clean with brake cleaner. Laying on my back, I shone the light on the area, while holding a mirror. It still wasn't clear enough for me to read accurately. I then took my grease pencil, and ran it over the numbers. The purpose of the grease pencil is to provide contrast with the metal of the axle tube. When I put the mirror back over the area, I was rewarded with a very sharp image of the part numbers, which I copied into my notebook. According to the numbers, this rear axle assembly had a 4.10: 1 gear ratio limited slip. The axle was assembled June 16, 1969. Are you seeing a pattern starting to appear here? The axlenumbers also indicated the axle to be original to the car based on the dates codes referencing June 1969 build date. I took the same approach with the other parts.

Here are my findings. The cylinder heads, intake manifold, carburetor logo, and transmission were the correct part numbers for the car. However none of these parts were date coded to the car. One of the heads was manufactured in April 1968, the other head was manufactured in February of 1969. The transmission was manufactured January 24, 1969. The reason I know all of these parts are not correctly date coded to the car is the decoded each one, by researching the part numbers and date codes. All of this information is important, because not only did it verify what the owner had told me, and it alsoshowed that the other parts were in line with the build date. Thereby providing further confirmation of what I was looking at. During my investigating, I took pictures with a digital camera of all of the parts and part numbers, as best as i could. I spent about 30 minutes walking around the car with a video camera and editorializing what I was taking footage of. I also took the list of things the Camaro expert had told me about and checked them off one by one. Later in the week I called the Camaro expert and shared my findings. I reviewed all of my research, including going over the individual part numbers, and the ' things to look for "checklist. By the end of the phone call, I was 99 percent positive that this Camaro was what it was being advertised as.

The last thing Idid was to have the car documented and certified by a Certified appraiser Camaro.

GM also stamped hidden VIN numbers in (2) different places on the car. The reason for the hidden VIN numbers was to add another step in preventing and identifying a stolen car. Because it is fAirly easy to remove and swap out the VIN tag on the dash, the hidden VIN's provided a back-up system of check and balances. For example, someone could possibly swap out VIN tags, but if they didn't know about the Hidden VIN numbers, a person in the know could easily identify the numbers not matching up. Because the car was bought to roller project, it was easy to check these hidden VIN 's, against the VIN tag on the dash. I wanted the appraiser to check them personally, and heconfirmed as matching the numbers and authentic. In other words the certificate authenticates the car. Many appraisers will also Supply you with a report on their findings. The nice thing about having a car certified is this type of paperwork is normally viewed as iron clad documentation. It normally raises the value of the car, because of the authenticity certificate. And if you ever go to sell the car, now you have documentation to provide the seller that the car is a real (Super Sport, Rally Sport, Z/28, etc. You fill in the blank)

Some people may wonder why would anyone go through all of this work.

However, keep in mind that many of these muscle cars are 20 plus years old and have gone through numerous owners andmodifications. All of that history is prior to it being restored back to showroom original condition. In other words, many parts are bolt on and interchangeable from other models and different years. So just because the parts look ok, doesn't mean that they even belong on the car. In the above example about the couple and the Chevelle, the car was priced as a Super Sport, yet the trim tag and other numbers reflected a totally different story. Even though the car was beautifully restored, it was really nothing more than a modified base model 6 cylinder, Chevelle that someone converted over to a V-8 at some time in it's life. Don't get me wrong, there is nothing wrong with modifying a car to an individual owners taste. The issue is when the car issold and the seller forgets to mention (consciously or unconsciously) and inform the new owner of the modifications. Our Chevelle couple would have gladly paid the asking price if the car was a true Super Sport. But, because they knew how to decode the car, they were able to save themselves a lot of time, money and aggravation. At the time the difference between a plain Jane Chevelle and a real Super Sport was over $ 10,000. Just to throw some numbers out there, let's be conservative and say it takes 6 hours of research to decode a car. Using our $ 10,000 figure, that equates to approximately $ 1,600 an hour. Not a bad return on your time investment. As muscle and classic cars have become more popular, I have seen many cases where just for the fun of it, anowner will start to do research on a car he or she owns.

Discovering your car isn't really what you thought you purchased can really knock the wind out of you. By investing a small amount of money, and time, researching and decoding your prospective muscle car purchase you can sleep at night knowing that you received the value you paid for. Anyone else interested in investing a couple of hours for peace of mind when purchasing a classic or muscle car?

VIN Number Decoding For Classic Muscle Cars

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